Asia

Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF)

Photo: © Thaung Ret

Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF)

Location: The Indo-Burma Hotspot, comprising all non-marine parts of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam, plus parts of southern China. 

Duration: IUCN is leading the second phase (2013-2018) of the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund’s (CEPF) work in the Indo-Burma hotspot

Project Background:

Everyone depends on Earth’s ecosystems and their life-sustaining benefits, such as clean air, fresh water and healthy soils. Founded in 2000, the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) is a global leader in enabling civil society to participate in and benefit from conserving some of the world’s most critical ecosystems.

CEPF provide grants for nongovernmental and private sector organizations to help protect biodiversity hotspots, Earth’s most biologically rich yet threatened areas.

The convergence of critical areas for conservation with millions of people who are impoverished and highly dependent on healthy ecosystems for their survival is more evident in the hotspots than anywhere else.

Enabling a stronger voice, influence and action by civil societies is the hallmark of our approach. CEPF’s support equips civil society groups to conserve their environment and influence decisions that affect lives, livelihoods and, ultimately, the global environment for the benefit of all. Grant recipients range from small farming cooperatives and community associations to private sector partners and international organizations.

IUCN is leading the second phase (2013-2018) of the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund’s (CEPF) work in the Indo-Burma hotspot, working together with the Myanmar Environment Rehabilitation-conservation Network (MERN) and Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden (KFBG) to form the CEPF Regional Implementation Team (RIT).

The total value of this conservation investment in the Indo-Burma hotspot is USD10.4 million. The fund aims to bridge the gap between Indo-Burma's development and conservation needs by improving protection and management of priority sites and species, and support the development of the civil society component of the hotspot’s conservation community. The investment is guided by a strategy known as an “ecosystem profile.”

Objectives of the project:

Projects funded through CEPF address one of five priority strategic directions:

  • safeguarding priority species by mitigating threats;
  • demonstrating innovative responses to illegal wildlife trade;
  • empowering communities to engage in conservation and management of priority key biodiversity areas;
  • mainstreaming biodiversity, communities, and livelihoods into development planning in priority corridors; and
  • building capacity of civil society to work on biodiversity, communities, and livelihoods.​

Donors:   l’Agence Française de Développement, Conservation International, the European Union, the Global Environment Facility, the Government of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the World Bank. 

Partners:  Myanmar Environment Rehabilitation-conservation Network (MERN) and Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden (KFBG) to form the CEPF Regional Implementation Team (RIT).

For more information, please visit the CEPF website.

 

 

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