Making REDD Work for the Poor

09 December 2007 | Project description

IUCN, in collaboration with the Poverty and Environment Partnership (PEP), hosted an event during the Bali conference on climate change. As part of a full day devoted to the role of forests in climate change, organized by CIFOR, IUCN helped to ensure that social issues and linkages to poverty reduction were high on the agenda.

IUCN, in collaboration with the Poverty and Environment Partnership (PEP), hosted an event during the Bali conference on climate change. As part of a full day devoted to the role of forests in climate change, organized by CIFOR, IUCN helped to ensure that social issues and linkages to poverty reduction were high on the agenda. The PEP event examined proposals in the current round of climate change negotiations for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD), focusing on how these new climate mitigation mechanisms can ‘work for the poor’.

With an audience of over 200 people, experts from around the world shared insights from experience on how to integrate poverty reduction in forest conservation and sustainable forest management, and the implications for the design of new REDD mechanisms.

A consistent theme of the discussions was that social concerns should not be considered ‘add-ons’ but are essential to the sustainability of any REDD scheme. Effective participation of rural communities and equitable benefit sharing mechanisms are key to the successful implementation of REDD. A ‘pro-poor’ approach to REDD needs to focus on strengthening the rights of vulnerable populations, especially women, to forest resources.


View of logging road in the Cameroon Forests