CEPF launches new call for proposals in the Indo-Burma hotspot

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) has launched a call for proposals for small grant projects in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam and parts of Southern China. A separate call for proposals for large grant projects in Myanmar has also been issued simultaneously. 

Indo-Burma Biodiversity hotspot

CEPF is a global leader in enabling civil society to participate in and benefit from conserving some of the world’s most critical ecosystems. In 2013, the CEPF Indo-Burma Regional Implementation Team (RIT) – comprising IUCN, the Myanmar Environment Rehabilitation-Conservation Network and the Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden - led the second phase of CEPF’s work in the Indo-Burma region by launching a regional US$ 10.4 million, five-year investment for the conservation of biodiversity focusing on awarding small and large grants to civil society organisations.

The latest call for proposals for small grants projects is open to non-government organisations, community groups, private companies and other civil society organisations in Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam and parts of Southern China. The call for proposals for large grants projects is open to international and national organizations, groups and companies in Myanmar only.

The deadline for submission of Letters of Inquiry (LoIs) is Wednesday, 17 August 2016. More information and the format for submitting LoIs can be found here.

Small grants awarded to projects in all countries in the Indo-Burma hotspot must address one or more of the investment priorities of CEPF’s Strategic Directions 4 and 8, which are as follows: 

Strategic Direction 4. Empower local communities to engage in conservation and management of priority key biodiversity areas

4.1 Raise awareness about biodiversity conservation legislation among target groups at priority sites
4.2 Pilot and amplify community forests, community fisheries and community-managed protected areas
4.3 Develop co-management mechanisms for formal protected areas that enable community participation in management and governance
4.5 Support expansion of the protected area network in Myanmar using participatory gazettal, community consultation processes and/or community-based models

Strategic Direction 8. Strengthen the capacity of civil society to work on biodiversity, communities and livelihoods at regional, national, local and grassroots levels

8.1 Support networking activities that enable collective civil society responses to priority and emerging threats 
8.2 Provide core support for the organizational development of domestic civil society organizations 
8.3 Establish clearing-house mechanisms to match volunteers to civil society organizations’ training needs

Large grant projects in Myanmar must address the investment priority of CEPF's Strategic Direction 4 and one or more of the investment priorities of Strategic Direction 6, which are as follows: 

Strategic Direction 4. Empower local communities to engage in conservation and management of priority key biodiversity areas

4.5 Support expansion of the protected area network in Myanmar using participatory gazettal, community consultation processes and/or community-based models

Strategic Direction 6. Engage key actors in mainstreaming biodiversity, communities, and livelihoods into development planning in the priority corridors

6.1 Support civil society efforts to analyze development policies, plans and programs, evaluate their impact on biodiversity, communities and livelihoods and propose alternative development scenarios and appropriate mitigating measures where needed
6.2 Integrate the biodiversity and ecosystem service values of priority corridors into government land use and development plans at all levels and promote effective implementation and monitoring of these plans
6.3 Develop protocols and demonstration projects for ecological restoration that improve the biodiversity performance of government programs in the forestry and other natural resource sectors
6.4 Engage the media as a tool to increase awareness and inform public debate on mainstreaming biodiversity into development planning                                                                                                                                                          
6.5 Pilot models for biodiversity-friendly production, including certification and eco-labelling                                              6.6 Integrate the biodiversity and ecosystem service values of priority corridors into financial decision making by governments, private investors and development banks

Applicants are strongly encouraged to familiarise themselves with the CEPF investment strategy (summarised in Burmese, Chinese, Khmer, Lao, Thai and Vietnamese, and available in full in English here), and to contact the Indo-Burma Regional Implementation Team (RIT) at [email protected]  if they have any questions or wish to discuss project ideas.


Founded in 2000, the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a global leader in enabling civil society to participate in and benefit from conserving some of the world’s most critical ecosystems by providing grants for organizations to help protect biodiversity hotspots, Earth’s most biologically rich yet threatened areas. CEPF is a joint initiative of l'Agence Française de DéveloppementConservation International, the European Union, the Global Environment Facility, the Government of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the World Bank.

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