Infographic: Prioritizing forest landscape restoration investments

IUCN’s new infographic helps decision makers weigh the costs and benefits of possible forest landscape restoration activities.

Infographic: Prioritizing investments in forest landscape restoration

It is widely acknowledged that degraded land can impact the provision of ecosystem services, exacerbate poverty, and increase the frequency and intensity of natural disasters; forest landscape restoration (FLR) is one key way to address these issues. Although global support for FLR is increasing, financing is still limited, and deciding where to efficiently direct these resources can be challenging.

To help with this decision making, IUCN’s new infographic, based the report A Cost-Benefit Framework for Analyzing Forest Landscape Restoration Decisions, outlines how decision makers can analyse the costs and benefits of possible FLR activities. In nine steps, the framework shows how ecological and economic data can be combined to produce actionable choices, allowing decision makers to direct resources to the most promising landscapes.

This cost-benefit analysis process is a useful complement to IUCN’s Restoration Opportunities Assessment Methodology (ROAM). When using ROAM to locate areas of restoration potential, it is important for decision makers to understand how the value of ecosystem services may change if the landscape were to be restored, and thus make a measured assessment of the trade-offs of different restoration options, identify potential sources of restoration finance, and set prices for payment for ecosystem services.

The cost-benefit framework outlined in this infographic can be used to identify and invest in landscapes that meet strategic local and national priorities – ultimately helping countries and land owners produce the desired ecological outcomes for the least cost and the most gains for the landscape and those who depend on it.

Work area: 
Forests
Forests
Forests
Forest Landscape Restoration
Location: 
West and Central Africa
West and Central Africa
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