Dinner with a Dinosaur – Love Not Loss at the International Green Awards

12 December 2011 | News story

CEC's popular video on communicating biodiversity was shortlisted in the best audio visual category. Laurie Bennet, Rod Abson and Jeremy Bristow (see photo) represented CEC at the November event.

By Rod Abson, CEC Focal Point

It’s not every day you have dinner with a dinosaur. Thursday night, the 24th of November was the International Green Awards presentations held at the Natural History Museum in London, with a giant dinosaur looking over the guests representing some of the most innovative environmental initiatives from around the world. IUCN and the Commission on Education and Communication were represented by Rod Abson, CEC Focal Point, Jeremy Bristow, producer of ‘Love. Not Loss.’ and Laurie Bennett from Futerra who helped develop the love not loss concept.

The ‘Love. Not Loss.’ film had been shortlisted in the best audio visual category, alongside entries from Ireland, the United Kingdom and USA. As part of the film entry, we showcased the collective contribution from many partners to create the film, including the Convention on Biological Diversity Secretariat, WildScreen, Futerra and the IUCN Commission on Education and Communication. The film used sustainable film production techniques such as working with stock footage and engaging local film makers to provide footage to a central location for editing, instead of needing to fly one film crew around the world to film the scenes.

The winner was a film called ‘The Pipe’ which documents the struggles of a local community of fishermen fighting to prevent the installation of a major infrastructure pipe which threatened to change their livelihoods and environment. 

Whilst ‘Love. Not Loss.’ was not successful at the Green Awards, thinking has already begun for the possible next stage film to follow on from ‘Love. Not Loss.’. Stay tuned…

For more information on the International Green Awards >>

To view the film ‘Love. Not Loss.’, which has been watched almost 14,000 times in English, French, Spanish and Arabic, visit the IUCN YouTube Channel >>.