Sustainable tomorrow for Skadar Lake

12 November 2013 | News story
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IUCN SEE has initiated the implementation of a 3 year long project "Supporting the Long-Term Sustainable Management of Transboundary Lake Skadar", in partnership with the Institute for Nature Conservation in Albania (INCA) and Green Home of Montenegro. Improving practices and capacity for the management of protected areas, the project intends to foster the effective management of biodiversity of Skadar Lake, natural border between Albania and Montenegro.

Being the largest on the Balkan Peninsula, Skadar Lake witnessed a number of political agreements toward its improved management and international conservation efforts. With its partners, IUCN will build on the gathered experience and establish a cross-border exchange platform for protected area authorities and other stakeholders to work jointly and ensure the sustainable future of the shared lake.

Funded by the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund, the project aims at diminishing illegal activities  by strengthening law enforcement, increasing the participation of civil society organizations in monitoring and protected area management, increasing transparency and awareness rising on the importance of biodiversity conservation among key stakeholders and resource managers. 

The Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund is a joint initiative of l’Agence Française de Développement, Conservation International, the European Union, the Global Environment Facility, the Government of Japan, the MacArthur Foundation and the World Bank. A fundamental goal is to ensure civil society is engaged in biodiversity conservation.

For more information visit the project webpage, or contact Tomasz Pezold, Project Officer at IUCN’s Programme Office for South-Eastern Europe.


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This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.