COMESA and IUCN explore opportunity for collaboration

18 April 2011 | News story

IUCN and the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) have committed to strengthen their collaboration on issues of biodiversity conservation. This commitment was made when Ali Kaka, IUCN Regional Director for Eastern and Southern Africa, paid a courtesy call at the COMESA Secretariat recently.

 “I see a number of areas of common interest between our work and the work COMESA is doing in the region” says Ali Kaka, “the thematic areas of the IUCN programme align well with COMESA’s programme of work and most of the Member States of COMESA are also State members of IUCN”.

COMESA Secretary General Sindiso Ngwenya, indicated that COMESA is ready to collaborate with the IUCN on issues of biodiversity conservation. He noted that COMESA Secretariat is already addressing issues on biodiversity conservation within the COMESA Climate Change programme.

COMESA and IUCN have agreed to formalize their collaboration through signing of an MoU. Some of the areas of collaboration will include practical interventions on climate change, biodiversity conservation, food security and agroforestry.

COMESA’s membership includes Burundi, Comoros, DR Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Its vision is “ to endeavour to achieve sustainable economic and social progress in all Member States through increased co-operation and integration in all fields of development particularly in trade, customs and monetary affairs, transport, communication and information, technology, industry and energy, gender, agriculture, environment and natural resources.”

For more information, please contact Ali Kaka, ali.kaka@iucn.org


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.