The Way Forward for Water User Associations, Tanzania

12 October 2010 | News story

IUCN together with the Pangani River Basin Management Project and Global Water Initiative partners held a 3 day workshop on sharing experiences around community participation in water resources management in Morogoro, Tanzania from 14 to 16 September.

The objectives of the workshop were to share experiences and knowledge on community participation in water resources management in Tanzania (and East Africa). Such experiences include “lessons and challenges on the establishment and operationalization of Water User Associations or WUAs”, said Katharine Cross, Programme Officer of the IUCN East and Souther Africa Water and Wetlands Programme. “Also on the discussion table were sustainability mechanisms of WUAs, and the relationships or interactions of those with other institutions at the local level”.

Further topics of knowledge sharing at the workshop included developing recommendations such as guidelines on improving community participation in water resources, including process-documentation.

The meeting was attended by more than 50 participants from 9 River Basin Offices in Tanzania, in particular represented by community development officers. Also present were representatives from other Eastern African countries such as Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia.

Creating a network in Tanzania (and across East Africa) to continue sharing information on community participation and engagement around WUAs was discussed and would be further developed.

The workshop, which was hosted by the WAMI/Ruvu Basin Water Board, finished with a field trip to sites around Morogoro where WUAs are being established.

For more information, please contact Katharine.cross@iucn.org or Emmanuel.mwendera@iucn.org

The full agenda, workshop presentations and photos can be found at this link: http://www.iucn.org/pangani
 

 


This image shows the courtship behavior of Indian Bull frogs (Holobatrachus tigerinus). During the monsoon, the breeding males become bright yellow in color, while females remain dull. The prominent blue vocal sacs of male produce strong nasal mating call.